Xericstyle

Xeric and stylish gardening in San Antonio, Texas

Wide shot – September 2014

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It has been very dry this summer in San Antonio, and my garden certainly reflects that. Especially my gulf muhly grasses (Muhlenbergia capillaris) that need more water then I ever give anything…I see a change coming…

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Although, everything is hanging in there (mostly), waiting on the fall rains to start.

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I “keep it real” with my garden – I don’t dump water on stuff. I just don’t. My garden is mostly native, and it is rough and raw and sometimes not pretty. Just like in life, our garden’s have their ups and downs, and it is all part of the process.

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15 Comments

  1. melissamontgomery911391518

    Yes just like in life, ups and downsŠ.loved that. :)

    From: Xericstyle Reply-To: Xericstyle Date: Friday, 12 September, 2014 10:14 AM To: montgomery Subject: [New post] Wide shot ­ September 2014

    WordPress.com xericstyle posted: ” It has been very dry this summer in San Antonio, and my garden certainly reflects that. Especially my gulf muhly grasses that need more water then I like to give things…I see a change coming… Although, everything is hanging in there (mostl”

  2. Andrea

    well said! your yard looks amazing!!!

  3. Happy September! I gave my plants a pep talk hoping they’d hang in there – it looks like we’ll all get some rain soon enough. We do water once a week and occasionally I’ll hand water a container or something I’m trying to coddle along for a while (like when I transplant something in late July or cough-cough August! and know it won’t survive my impatience otherwise). But that’s the beauty of using natives isn’t it? They’re constitutionally geared to outlast August.

    Here’s my Wide Shot post which I went ahead and put up the end of August (just ignore that comment about you being missing in action, please, because here you are!!!)
    http://austinagrodolce.blogspot.com/2014/08/plans-for-transplantation.html

    • I am a fan of pep talks too!!!! :). Thanks so much for your post…and no worries, I HAVE been missing in action. Cheers!- xericstyle

  4. Your yard still looks fantastic! This is proof that landscape design and picking the right plants is so important. Hope you are getting some much needed rain.

  5. Now I see your issue with Gulf Muhly…but the big picture shows a very well-put-together space, though I have a bias since we design similarly! Your twin desert willows really work well, so do the cacti, and the rest looks perfect with the above. I also like how the agave on the left ties in with the cacti.

    Best of luck on your grass replacement (don’t go with Deergrass / M. rigens, it is also thirsty without reguler drip irrigation, contrary to what some say).

  6. I’m fighting that crunchy grass syndrome too. Funny, how the environment reflects my mood. The heat has me feeling as dormant as my yard. The good thing about Texas weather is it’s guaranteed to change. Here’s hoping for a fall shower!

  7. I bet those Gulf muhlys will perk up. I have the same problem with herbaceous salvias. They like that water! But your garden is really beautiful!

    • Thank you, Linda…I sure hope you are right! It’s my favorite grass. :( – xericstyle

  8. It might look toasty to you, but I can really see how everything is filling in, and I bet the gulf muhly will perk up. Your desert willows in particular really seem to be taking off! I wish mine looked as happy!

  9. Debra

    For what it is worth: your garden looks pretty to me =)

  10. I never have any luck with Gulf muhly either, and I think I’ve finally given up on it. Maybe. It IS so beautiful. I’m really liking the truly dry-loving pine muhly, which I first admired at Plano Prairie Garden. He gave me a small volunteer, and it THRIVES in my hot, dry gravel garden. Not pink, but it’s got a great Koosh-ball form.

    • Sounds AWESOME! Thanks, Pam! I will look into it. -xericstyle

  11. I was just about to suggest pine muhly and I see that Pam already did. I got rid of my gulf muhly because I only liked the look when it was in bloom. The rest of the year it just looked weedy to me. I am sure yours will look great once it starts blooming. Your overall wideshots still look very nice. They are an incredible contrast to the look from just a few years ago.

    • I will be looking for the P.M…thank you, Michael! -xericstyle

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